Daily Gospel – Wednesday, May 29, 2024 – Mark 10,32-45 – Catholic Bible

First Reading (1Peter 1,18-25)

Reading of the First Letter of Saint Peter.

Dear friends, you know that you were rescued from the futile life inherited from your fathers, not through perishable things, such as silver or gold, but through the precious blood of Christ, like a lamb without blemish or blemish. Before the creation of the world, he was destined for this, and in this end of time, he appeared, for your sake. It is through him that you reached faith in God. God raised him from the dead and gave him glory, and so your faith and hope are in God.

By obedience to the truth, you purified your souls, to practice fraternal love without pretense. Therefore, love one another, wholeheartedly and ardently. You were born again, not of corruptible seed, but of incorruptible, through the living and permanent word of God.
Indeed, “all flesh is like grass, and all its glory is like the flower of the grass; the grass is withered, its flower falls. But the word of the Lord stands forever.” Now this word is what was announced to you in the Gospel.

– Word of the Lord.

– Thank God.

Gospel (Mark 10,32-45)

— PROCLAMATION of the Gospel of Jesus Christ according to Saint Mark.

— Glory to you, Lord.

At that time, the disciples were on their way, going up to Jerusalem. Jesus went ahead. The disciples were amazed, and those who followed were afraid. Jesus took the Twelve aside again and began to tell them what was about to happen to him: “Behold, we are going up to Jerusalem, and the Son of Man will be handed over to the high priests and teachers of the Law. They will condemn him to death and will hand him over to the pagans. They will mock him, spit on him, torture him and kill him. And after three days he will rise again.”

James and John, sons of Zebedee, came to Jesus and said to him, “Master, we want you to do for us what we ask.” He asked, “What do you want me to do for you?” They replied, “Let us sit, one at your right and one at your left, when you are in your glory!” Jesus then said to them, “You do not know what you ask. Can you drink the cup that I am going to drink? Can you be baptized with the baptism with which I am going to be baptized?” They responded, “We can.” And he said to them, “You will drink the cup that I must drink, and you will be baptized with the baptism with which I must be baptized. But it is not up to me to grant the place at my right or at my left. It is for those to whom it was reserved”.

When the other ten disciples heard this, they were indignant at James and John. Jesus called them and said, “You know that the rulers of the nations oppress them and the great men tyrannize over them. But it must not be like this among you: whoever wants be great, let him be your servant; and whoever wants to be first, let him be slave of all. For the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve and to give his life as a ransom for many.”

— Word of Salvation.

— Glory to you, Lord.

Reflecting the Word of God

My dear brothers and sisters in Christ,

Today, we are called to reflect on two deeply significant passages of Scripture: the first reading of the First Letter of Peter and the Gospel according to Mark. Both readings lead us to a deeper understanding of Jesus’ sacrifice and the call to service in our Christian lives.

In the First Letter of Peter we read: “You know that it was not with perishable goods, such as silver or gold, that you were redeemed from your vain way of life, received by tradition from your fathers, but by the precious blood of Christ, as of a lamb without blemish and without blemish.” This verse reminds us of the inestimable cost of our redemption. We were not bought with material riches, but with the precious blood of Jesus. He gave himself for us, the flawless Lamb of God, to rescue us from a life without purpose and offer us eternal life.

This message is particularly powerful as we reflect on what it means to be rescued. In contemporary society, we are constantly being bombarded with the idea that value and security come from material possessions, status or power. However, Peter reminds us that these things are perishable and cannot give us true freedom or redemption. Instead, our hope is in something far more precious and eternal: the sacrifice of Christ.

This truth should lead us to deep gratitude and humility. We must ask ourselves: How are we living our lives in light of this sacrifice? Are we recognizing the inestimable value of what Christ has done for us, or are we being lured by the empty promises of the world? The answer to this question should move us to a life of holiness, as Peter continues to exhort us, reminding us that “all flesh is like grass, and all its glory is like the flower of the grass. and the flower falls; but the word of the Lord remains forever.”

Turning now to the Gospel of Mark, we find Jesus and his disciples on their way to Jerusalem, where Jesus predicts his passion for the third time. He speaks clearly about the sufferings that await him: “Behold, we are going up to Jerusalem, and the Son of Man will be handed over to the high priests and the scribes. They will condemn him to death and hand him over to the Gentiles, they will mock him, they will spit on him, they will scourge him and they will kill him; but three days later he will rise again.”

Despite this grim prediction, the disciples James and John approach Jesus with an ambitious request: “Grant us that in your glory we may sit one at your right and one at your left.” They have not yet fully understood the kind of kingdom Jesus came to establish. They still think in terms of earthly power and glory.

Jesus, with patience and love, responds: “You do not know what you ask. Can you drink the cup that I am going to drink? And be baptized with the baptism with which I am going to be baptized?” They claim they can, but Jesus warns them that although they share in his sufferings, granting places of honor is not up to Him, but to the Father.

This interaction offers us a valuable lesson about the true nature of discipleship and service. Jesus continues, teaching all the disciples: “You know that those who are considered rulers of the nations lord it over them, and their great ones exercise authority over them. But it must not be so among you; whoever wants to become great among you will be your servant ; and whoever wants to be first among you will be servant of all. For the Son of Man himself did not come to be served, but to serve and to give his life as a ransom for many.”

Here, Jesus redefines the concept of greatness. In the kingdom of God, true greatness is not measured by power or position, but by service and humility. He calls us to follow His example of sacrificial service, where leadership is expressed through love and service to others.

As we reflect on these readings, we are challenged to reevaluate our own ambitions and attitudes. Are we seeking positions of prominence and recognition, or are we willing to become servants of one another? Are we ready to drink the cup of sacrifice and renunciation, following the example of Jesus?

Let’s think about our everyday life. Each of us faces daily opportunities to serve. It can be in loving care for our family, dedication to our work, helping a neighbor, or participating in our faith community. In all of these situations, we are called to imitate Christ, serving with humility and love.

To make this more tangible, let’s imagine our life as a candle. A candle is made to shine, but it can only do that if it consumes itself. Likewise, we are called to illuminate the world around us, even if it means personal sacrifice. Our light shines brightest when we are willing to give of ourselves for others.

However, this journey of service is not easy. It requires strength, courage and, above all, a deep trust in God. We must remember that we are not alone. The Holy Spirit empowers and guides us, and God’s grace sustains us. When we feel weak or discouraged, we can turn to Him in prayer, seeking renewal and strength.

Let us now take a moment of silence to reflect on how we can apply these lessons to our lives. Let us close our eyes and ask God for the grace to be true servants, following the example of Jesus in everything we do.

Lord, we thank You for Your incomparable sacrifice and for calling us to follow Your example of humble service. Help us to live according to Your will, to use our gifts and resources for the good of others, and to pursue greatness through service. May we be light in the world, reflecting Your love in every action and word. Amen.

As we leave here today, let us take with us the determination to live as faithful servants of Christ. May God’s grace accompany us and may we be instruments of His peace and love in the world. Remember, true greatness is in serving – let us shine and flavor the world with God’s goodness, justice and love. Amen.